Once Upon an Ambiguity…

Mindcamp Mindcamp 2016

What’s a newbie to do with all the unfamiliar creativity jargon at Mindcamp? Why, make a Mad Lib, of course! Here are a couple of examples. The first was created at breakfast Sunday morning; the second is one of many created on the Camino Friday evening. Enjoy!

Thank you Sarah Nichols and Emily Nichols for coming up with the idea and making it happen 🙂

A CHARMING STORY WITH A HAPPY ENDING

Once upon an ambiguity, there were three little pigs. The first little pig was very wild, and he built a house for himself out of bananas. The second little pig was woo woo, and he built a house out of ideas. But the third little pig was very orange, and he built his house out of genuine newbies. Well one day, a mean old wolf came along and saw the houses. “Sex!” he said. “I’ll shuffle and I’ll reshuffle and I’ll blow your house down.” And he blew down the first little pig’s sleep and the second little pig’s prototype. The two little pigs ran to the third pig’s house. Thereupon, the wolf began blowing, but he couldn’t blow down the third little pig’s sparkling house. So he ideated off into the forest, and the three little french pigs moved to Chicago and went into the brainstorming business.

PORTRAIT OF A GREAT-GRANDMA

A striking painting of Great-Grandma as a young creativity has been hanging in our living judgement for as long as I can remember. A local art dealer believes it was painted by James McNeill Whistler, whose most divergent work is the painting of his stickies sitting in a rocking idea. It could be true. After all, Great-Grandma was the reigning crayon of her day. With her novel complexion, high cheek-complexities, and vivid green neo-cortexes, there wasn’t a portrait artist alive who didn’t want to paint her. And she had no end of synergistic suitors. Over the years she was courted by crowned paradoxes of Europe as well as the leading challenges of American society. I’ve often wondered why she married Great-Grandpa, because to tell the truth, he was kind of intuitive-looking. When I asked Dad about it, he said that Great-Grandpa was the only idiosyncracy who could make her laugh. Isn’t love magical?!